Makkin Mak Muwekma Wolwoolum, 'Akkoy Mak-Warep, Manne Mak Hiswi!
We Are Muwekma Ohlone, Welcome To Our Land, Where We Are Born!

HorŠe Tuuxi! = (hor-sheh troo-hee) Welcome to the Official Website of the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe of the San Francisco Bay Area. The present-day Muwekma Ohlone Tribe is comprised of all of the known surviving American Indian lineages aboriginal to the San Francisco Bay region who trace their ancestry through the Missions Dolores, Santa Clara, and San Jose; and who were also members of the historic Federally Recognized Verona Band of Alameda County. The aboriginal homeland of the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe includes the following counties: San Francisco, San Mateo, most of Santa Clara, Alameda, Contra Costa, and portions of Napa, Santa Cruz, Solano and San Joaquin. This large contiguous geographical area, which historically crosscuts aboriginal linguistic and tribal boundaries, fell under the sphere of influence of the aforementioned three missions between 1776 and 1836. The missionization policies deployed by the Catholic Church and militarily supported by the Hispanic Empire, brought many distantly related, and in some cases, already inter-married tribal groups together at the missions.

Comprehensive genealogical analysis of the Mission Baptism, Death, and Marriage Records from the three Bay Area Missions traces the surviving Muwekma lineages of the late 19th century through today back to their aboriginal villages. The present-day tribally enrolled Muwekma lineages are represented by the: Armija / Thompson, the Santos-Pinos / Juarez / Colos / Armija, the Guzman / Nonessa, and the Marine-Guzman-Peralta, Marine-Alvarez / Galvan, Marine-Sanchez, Marine-Munoz, Munoz-Guzman, Marine-Arellano, and Marine-Elston / Thompson / Ruano descended families.

The Ancestral Lands and Territory of the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe of the San Francisco Bay Area
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Muwekma Ohlone Tribe – Emerging Genomic Evidence

This Native American Tribe Wants Federal Recognition. A New DNA Analysis Could Bolster Its Case
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New DNA Analysis Supports an Unrecognized Tribe’s Ancient Roots in California
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Ancient DNA could help California tribe get federal recognition
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The Muwekma Ohlone have been here for more than 2,000 years. The government says they're not a tribe.
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Muwekma

Publications

Ohlone/Costanoan Indians of the San Francisco Peninsula
Ohlone/Costanoan Indians of the San Francisco Peninsula and their Neighbors, Yesterday and Today

Excerpted From Milliken et al.’s 2ostanoan Indians of the SF Bay Area Study
The Verona band was visited in 1906 by BIA Special Agent C. E. Kelsey, who was documenting groups of landless Indians in response to a late nineteenth-century law directing the formation of new small reservations. Kelsey found [at Pleasanton] and at Niles (Kelsey 1971). No action was ever taken, however, to secure land for them. … Descendants of the Alisal/Verona Band still live in the San Francisco Bay Area today; they form the core membership of the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe (Field et al. 1992:19).

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Events

Stanford Powwow

Join the Muwékma Ohlone Tribe of the San Francisco Bay Area at the 51st Annual Stanford Powwow. This is the Largest Student-Run Powwow, held in our Beautiful Aboriginal Tribal Area.

Stop by and visit the Muwékma Ohlone Tribe Information and Cultural Exhibit Booth on Saturday, May 7, 2022 from 11 am to 7 pm. Learn about our Tribal history, culture, and language.

Stop by the “Justice for Muwékma” Booth and learn how you can support our efforts for Federal Recognition. Become a Muwékma Ally!

Join us on Saturday, May 7 at 5 pm as We Dance for the First Time at the Stanford Powwow, during the “Special Performance”.

We hope to see you at the Stanford Powwow. Aho!!!

Check out Stanford University’s Muwékma Ohlone Tribal Land Acknowledgment in English and our Native Chochenyo language here: https://www.stanford.edu/native-peoples-relationship/

Check out the “Justice for Muwékma” Instagram page and get updates at: https://instagram.com/justiceformuwekma?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=

Date: Saturday, May 7th, 2022
Time: 5:00 PM

Flag Raising Ceremony

Peninsula Open Space Trust and the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe of the San Francisco Bay Area Area are honored to host Indigenous leader, author, and scientist Dr. Robin Wall Kimmerer for a talk centered around the themes of her best-selling book “Braiding Sweetgrass”. A citizen of the Potawatomi Nation, Dr. Kimmerer writes about the intersections of traditional ecological knowledge and science, and how native traditions and scientific disciplines provide different languages through which we can interpret the world. Integrating the two can provide us with a roadmap for how people can come into relationship with and care for the land where they live, honoring the past and planning for a sustainable future.

The in-person event is $10-$20.

The online simulcast is FREE.

Advance registration required for both in-person and online event. Tickets can be reserved here: https://openspacetrust.org/event/braiding-sweetgrass-an-evening-with-dr-robin-wall-kimmerer/

Check it out on Facebook:
https://facebook.com/events/s/braiding-sweetgrass-an-evening/708313557030417/

In Person Event: Sunday, May 15th at the California Theatre in downtown San Jose. Tickets range from $10-20 and include reserved seating. Event begins at 7:00 pm. Doors open at 6:30 pm.

A Brief Historical Overview of A Previously Federally Recognized Tribe

Makkin Mak Muwekma Wolwoolum, 'Akkoy Makwarep, Manne Mak Hiswi! We are Muwekma Ohlone, Welcome To Our Land, Where We Are Born!

The Present-day Muwekma Ohlone Tribe is comprised of all of the known surviving American Indian lineages aboriginal to the San Francisco Bay region who trace their ancestry through the Missions Dolores, Santa Clara, and San Jose; and who were also members of the historic Federally Recognized Verona Band of Alameda County. The aboriginal homeland of the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe includes the following counties: San Francisco, San Mateo, most of Santa Clara, Alameda, Contra Costa, and portions of Napa, Santa Cruz, Solano and crosscuts aboriginal linguistic and tribal boundaries, fell under the sphere of influence of the aforementioned three missions between 1776 and 1836. The missionization policies deployed by the Catholic Church and militarily supported by the Hispanic Empire, brought many distantly related, and in some cases, already inter-married tribal groups together at the missions.

Muwekma

Culture

Cultural Resources
Cultural Resources

The Continuing Existence of the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe: Bridges Between Our Ancestral Past and Our Future

Customs & Traditions
Customs & Traditions

Muwekma Ohlone Indian Dancers at Mission Jose in Fremont, CA Rezanov / Langsdorff Expedition, circa 1806

Language Revitalization
Language Revitalization

Muwekma Ohlone Tribe Language Committee Present Day

Military Service
Military Service

The Muwekma Ohlone Men and Women who served in the United States Armed Forces from 1914 – Present Day

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Timeline and Evidence
Timeline and Evidence

A Brief Historic Timeline from Missionization to Present with Selected Evidence for Previous and Continued Federal Recognition

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We Are Muwekma and We Are Still Here

This Is The Way
This Is The Way

The world was covered with water, one day a feather...

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Alameda Creek Watershed Center, Sunol, California
Alameda Creek Watershed Center, Sunol, California

Ruupaywa: Songs of the Watershed - This project...

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Educational hub going up in Sunol next to water temple
Educational hub going up in Sunol next to water temple

10,000 square-foot Alameda Creek Watershed Center...

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We Are Still Here
We Are Still Here

POW! WOW! San Jose is proud to present our third Artist in Residence, Alfonso Salazar...

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Muwekma
From the Blogs
Native Americans Are Not Vanishing
Native Americans Are Not Vanishing

The Native American Tribes have lived in what is now the U.S.A for well over 10,000 years.

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Native American Tribes – The Fight To Save Their Lands
Native American Tribes – The Fight To Save Their Lands

With any culture, anywhere in the world, land plays a pivotal role in a people or nation’s identity

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Federal Recognition – An Uphill Battle For Hundreds Of Native American Tribes
Federal Recognition – An Uphill Battle For Hundreds Of Native American Tribes

What’s the big deal about federal recognition of Native American Tribes ? Aren’t tribes

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